Five Common Myths about Divorce

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Arbitration, Child Support, Collaborative Family Law, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Divorce, Equalization, Family Law, Separation, Separation Agreements, Spousal Support0 Comments

Both Spouses Need to Consent to Divorce In Canada, if one spouse wants to divorce, they do not need to seek their spouse’s consent to divorce. Canadian courts will grant a divorce under three grounds: if spouses have been separated from each other for a year without reconciling; if a spouse has proven adultery occurred during the marriage and they have not absolved their spouse; and if one spouse proved they received mentally or physically cruel treatment from their spouse. The Spouse Who Earns Less Income Always Receives Spousal Support Unlike child support, separated and divorced spouses do not have an automatic right to receive spousal support when their marriage ends. Separated spouses may be entitled to receive spousal support. There are several factors which give rise to an entitlement to spousal support. These factors include the length of the marriage or relationship, the roles each spouse played in the … Read More

Five Reasons Why You Should Choose Collaborative Divorce

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), Child Support, Collaborative Family Law, Coronavirus, COVID-19, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law, Marriage Contracts, Separation, Separation Agreements, Spousal Support0 Comments

One: It’s Faster Traditional litigation can be a lengthy, time-consuming process, and it can take years to reach a resolution. With litigation, the courts decide when and how a matter moves forward. Even at the best of times, many courts have a large backlog. Since mid-March 2020, the courts in Ontario have suspended regular operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While the courts have continued to hear emergency matters and have recently expanded their scope of operations, they will not resume normal operations until July 6, 2020 at the earliest. There inevitably will be a large backlog when the courts reopen. Most collaborative professionals, along with mediators and arbitrators, continue to work during the pandemic by offering their services virtually. Two: It’s More Economical Collaborative divorce often costs less than going to court. The court process is expensive, and its costs are unpredictable. Traditional litigation requires a lot of preparation, … Read More

Divorce and Separation: Spouses jointly owned business’

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Division of Property, Divorce, Separation, Separation Agreements0 Comments

When parties separate, tensions are high with both parties making lifestyle adjustments, attempting to divide assets and often negotiating  parenting arrangements.  In the case where parties share business interests or are partners in business, this can lead to increased stress, where the business and therefore the spouses current and future financial security remains entwined with a soon to be ex-spouse’s. In the case of Danecker v. Danecker, 2013 ONSC 1605, the husband and wife were both physiotherapists.  Their marriage ultimately broke down in late 2009 and at the date of separation, they were equal partners in an unincorporated physiotherapy clinic. The husband attempted, without success, to set up his own separate clinic but eventually was employed by a local hospital. Upon the separation, the wife bought out the husband’s share of the building and continued to operate for three years without any profits being shared with the husband. As part … Read More

Divorce: How are business assets split?

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Division of Property, Divorce, Marriage Contracts, Separation0 Comments

When parties separate, there are often disputes over one party’s entitlement to the other party’s shares or interest in a private or family business. If a marriage contract was executed validly, this contract may govern the splitting of business assets.  Where there is no marriage contract, there is no specific method of valuating a business under the Family Law Act and parties should always be aware that different methods can result in different values with different tax consequences.  Parties often hire two separate valuators and if both parties cannot agree, the issue will end up in the Family Courts. Entitlement to a share of the business Whilst a family business which has been inherited or gifted to one party may result in the business interest being exempted from matrimonial property, the value of a private business interest not inherited or gifted will fall presumptively into the category of matrimonial property … Read More

COVID-19 / Coronavirus: What Constitutes an Urgent Family Law Matter?

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Coronavirus, COVID-19, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law, Mobility Issues, Preservation Orders, Separation0 Comments

On March 15, 2020, the Chief Justice of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice released a Notice to the Profession advising that all scheduled family law hearings were adjourned until further notice. Similarly, as of March 20, 2020 the Ontario Court of Justice adjourned all scheduled family law hearings until May 29, 2020.  Both courts continue to hear urgent and emergency family law matters. According to the March 15, 2020 Notice to the Profession, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice will only hear urgent family law matters such as: requests for urgent relief relating to the safety of a child or parent (e.g., a restraining order, other restrictions on contact between the parties or a party and a child, or exclusive possession of the home); urgent issues that must be determined relating to the well-being of a child including essential medical decisions or issues relating to the wrongful removal or retention of … Read More

Divorce and Separation: Who gets the family pet?

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Commercial, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Separation, Separation Agreements0 Comments

Upon separation or divorce, a contentious issue is often which party gets to keep the family pet. Despite furry friends often being just as important to the family as children, Ontario’s courts have refused to make custody orders in respect of family pets. Justice Timms in Warnica v Gering stated “Whether in the Family Court or otherwise, I do not believe that any court should be in the business of making custody orders for pets, disguised or otherwise…  Obviously, I acknowledge that pets are of great importance to human beings.  Strong bonds develop between them and the human beings that look after them.  To some people, the relationship with their pets takes on a significance exceeding that of any other.  They go to extraordinary lengths to preserve that relationship; even at a cost that some would say is disproportionate.  Some may consider them to be children; however, they are not children.” … Read More

COVID-19 / Coronavirus: Alternatives to Family Court

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), Arbitration, Child Support, Collaborative Family Law, Coronavirus, COVID-19, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Family Law, Separation, Separation Agreements, Spousal Support0 Comments

As of March 17, 2020, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice suspended all regular operations for an indefinite period. Similarly, as of March 20, 2020 the Ontario Court of Justice suspended all regular operations until May 29, 2020. Both courts continue to hear urgent and emergency family law matters. Without access to the courts, family law litigants can still avail of a number of different options to resolve their family law disputes. Indeed, there are numerous forms of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). With consent, parties at any stage of litigation can agree to settle their issues outside of court with ADR. These processes can be a cheaper, faster, and less acrimonious way to settle family law disputes than traditional court litigation. Collaborative family law is an out-of-court resolution process which puts families first. With collaborative practice, parties work together, with their lawyers and other neutral professionals, such as family professionals … Read More

Cyberbullying in Family Law

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Custody and Access, Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law, Spousal Support0 Comments

Cyber-bullying is a growing concern in family law litigation. Some provinces already have legislation to deal with such issues. While Ontario currently does not, in recent years Ontario courts have recognized new common law remedies to address these issues. In Yenovkian v. Gulian, 2019 ONSC 7279, Justice Kristjanson of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice recognized the act of publicly placing a person in a false light as a new cause of action under the tort of invasion of privacy. Yenovkian involved an extremely acrimonious separation and custody dispute involving two children, one of whom has special needs. Shortly after separating in 2016, the Respondent, Ms. Gulian, took the parties children to England and refused to return to Ontario. The Applicant, Mr. Yenovkian, engaged in a cyberbullying campaign spanning several years against his estranged wife. This campaign included videotaping court-ordered access visits with the children, without the children’s knowledge and … Read More

Six Ways to Get an Annulment in Ontario

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Child Support, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law, Spousal Support0 Comments

Civil annulments are uncommon in Ontario as most separating spouses in Ontario choose to get a divorce. Annulments deem a marriage invalid, rendering the marriage null and void, as if it never happened. Essentially, an annulment means your marriage never occurred in the eyes of the law. Annulments are granted under a few specific grounds: 1. One of the spouses does not have the capacity to marry or could not consent to the marriage. Section 7 of Ontario’s Marriage Act states no one shall issue a licence to or solemnize the marriage of any person who lacks the mental capacity to marry by reason of being under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs or for any other reason. Predatory marriages, where a financially motivated person marries an elderly person to gain access to and control over their property, assets and estate, can fall under this category if the victim … Read More

The Matrimonial Home: What Happens  Post Separation?

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Division of Property, Divorce, Marriage Contracts0 Comments

The matrimonial home is often viewed as sacred ground for divorcing couples and disputes commonly arise over the ownership and possession of the property. In Ontario, special status is given to the matrimonial home due to it often being the most valuable and sentimental asset that a couple or family possesses. What is a ‘matrimonial home’? Section 18 of the Ontario Family Law Act defines the matrimonial home: “every property in which a person has an interest and that is, or, if the spouses have separated, was at the time of separation ordinarily occupied by the person and their spouse as their family residence”. Can there be more than one ‘matrimonial home’? There can be more than one ‘matrimonial home’ as long as at the date of separation, all of the properties are “ordinarily occupied” by the spouses as the “family residence”. The residence(s) being claimed as the ‘matrimonial home’ must … Read More

Common Law Couple Entitlements

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Division of Property, Divorce, Spousal Support0 Comments

Common Law Couples A common law relationship is not defined universally in law. Federal and provincial legislation use differing criteria to define common law relationships. For example, Ontario’s Family Law Act, defines common law relationships as one where parties reside together for at least three years or where parties are in a relationship of some permanence and have a child. Whereas, under the Income Tax Act, a common law relationship is defined as one where parties are in a conjugal relationship and living together for at least twelve continuous months. When you reside as common law spouses you are ‘spouses’ for the purpose of Government programs or benefits, except for those specifically applicable to ‘married spouses’. There is no formal separation process which must be followed. Married Couples  A married couple is a couple who have chosen to commit their lives together and have undertaken to legally bind their relationship. … Read More

Do I have to split an inheritance I’ve received in my divorce?

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law0 Comments

During a divorce, couples often argue over whether an inheritance received by one spouse is to be included in the assets and property to be divided. As a rule, inheritances or gifts received by one spouse are excluded from the property division calculation used when spouses separate and divorce. Be aware that the inheritance or gift must not be treated as matrimonial property or placed into a joint account, as this will create complex accounting issues in your joint finances which will be difficult to unravel to prove the ownership of the inheritance or gift. At the time of the divorce, the inheritance or gift must still be in existence, whether this is in the form of a physical object, or non-tangible property such as stocks and shares. Upon receipt of inheritance or a gift, unless a spouse wishes for it to form part of the matrimonial property, a spouse … Read More

2020 – Does the 20th year of marriage mean an indefinite spousal support obligation?

Elisha Hale, LL.B (Hons) Dip.Division of Property, Divorce, Spousal Support0 Comments

With 2020 now upon us, it seems appropriate to consider the impact of reaching your twenty-year anniversary and what impact this may have on your spousal support obligations. The Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines suggest that where spouses have been together for twenty years or more, the duration of spousal support should not end at a specified point, in essence rendering the obligation to be indefinite. However, the Courts will look at the particular circumstances of the spouses including the requirement to become self-sufficient, the standard of living that the spouse grew accustomed to throughout the marriage and the age and employment potential of the spouse claiming spousal support. In the recent case of Cowan v Cowan (2019) , the parties were married for 21.5 years. The wife was an anaesthesiologist and associate professor earning over $300,000 annually, and her husband who claimed spousal support was a teacher earning $92,000 per … Read More

What is a legal separation?

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law, Separation, Separation Agreements0 Comments

In Ontario, there is no such thing as ‘legal separation’. Married couples need to get divorced to finalize their separation and common law couples are not required to complete any formal process to separate. Separated spouses may wish to enter into a separation agreement. A separation agreement is a domestic contract between both spouses who no longer wish to remain together. A separation agreement can detail rights and obligations relating to property, spousal support, obligations relating to children, and any other issues that spouses may wish to regulate. Once the agreement is signed by both parties and witnessed, it is a legally binding contract just like any other and you cannot change the terms without an amendment or court order. Both spouses should always take independent legal advice to help avoid any agreement being overturned. Separation agreements are not mandatory, but they can provide a reassuring avenue to avoid acrimonious … Read More

Broken Engagements- Who Keeps the Ring?

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Division of Property, Family Law, Gift Law, Personal Property, Separation0 Comments

When an engagement ends, the question of who keeps the engagement ring is not as straight forward as one might assume. There is a long line of case law dating back centuries in which courts have struggled with this question. The traditional common law approach held that the party who ended the engagement loses claim to the ring. If the engagement ring is seen as conditional gift, the ring would go back to the donor. Section 33 of Ontario’s Marriage Act changed the common law approach slightly by stating the donee will keep the engagement ring if it’s an absolute gift, whereas the donor will get the ring back if it was a conditional gift. However, the Marriage Act also states a promise to marry cannot be enforced nor can a party bring a court action for a breach of a promise to marry. Removing the issue of fault in … Read More

Four Things to Know About Common Law Relationships

Kimberley Wilton, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Division of Property, Family Law, Marriage Contracts, Separation, Spousal Support0 Comments

1. Definition of Common Law Relationships There is no universal definition of a common law relationship. Federal and provincial legislation use differing criteria to define common law relationships. For example, Ontario’s Family Law Act, defines common law relationships as one where parties reside together for at least three years or where parties are in a relationship of some permanence and have a child. Whereas, under the Income Tax Act, a common law relationship is defined as one where parties are in a conjugal relationship and living together for at least twelve continuous months. 2. Spousal Support Common law spouses, like married spouses may be entitled to receive spousal support upon separation under Ontario’s Family Law Act. Once an entitlement to spousal support is established, the quantum and duration of spousal support is calculated based on the Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines. These guidelines determine the quantum and duration of support based … Read More

Gilbertson Davis LLP Welcomes Family Law Lawyer Kimberley Wilton!

John L. Davis, B.A. (Hons.), J.D.Adoption, Child Support, Collaborative Family Law, Custody and Access, Division of Property, Divorce, Family Law, Gilbertson Davis LLP News, Interjurisdictional Disputes, Marriage Contracts, Mobility Issues, Spousal Support0 Comments

Gilbertson Davis LLP extends a Warm Welcome to Family Law Lawyer Kimberley Wilton.  Kim was called to the Bars of Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador in 2013, after obtaining her Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Dalhousie University (2012; Schulich School of Law), a B.Sc. (Hons.) degree from the University of Toronto (Psychology and Middle Eastern Studies; 2006) and a B.A. degree from Memorial University (English Language and Literature; 2009).  Kim is also certified as a Collaborative Family Law Lawyer.   Kim is passionate about the provision of client service to a standard of excellence.  She has experience in a broad range of Family Law matters, including contentious custody and access disputes, child and spousal support claims, complex property disputes including the division of assets, adoption applications and mobility issues. She is also experienced in drafting parenting plans, separation plans and domestic contracts.  Kim is sensitive to the specific needs of each client, … Read More