Construction Arbitrator | Reasonable Hourly Rate | Good Availability

David Alderson, LL.B, LL.M (Commercial and Corporate), Q.Arb, Lawyer and ArbitratorArbitrators, Commercial, Condo Arbitrator, Condo Construction, Construction | Builders, Construction Arbitrator, Construction Litigation, Contract Disputes, Contract Termination, Cottage Litigation, Employment, Employment & Wrongful Dismissal, Expedited Arbitration, Force Majeure, Force Majeure Clauses, Fraudulent Schemes, Heavy Industries, Heavy Machinery Disputes, Infrastructure Arbitrator, Injunction & Specific Performance, International Joint Venture Arbitrator, Joint Venture Disputes, Labour Arbitrator, Mining, Infrastructure and Projects, Moving Litigation to Arbitration, Roster Arbitrator0 Comments

Construction arbitrators must be able to arbitrate efficiently and at the pace required by the parties, disputes ranging from simple renovations and repair, to complex multi-party multi-staged projects. The ability to understand construction stages and complexities of design, architecture, engineering and project management, and technical dimensions of a construction dispute are the hallmarks of an effective construction arbitrator. Experience In his practice here in Ontario, and when practicing in Dubai and Bermuda, David has been involved in a wide array of construction disputes, including, but not limited to project development, project finance, infrastructure and construction disputes, including matters involving parking garages, road building, residential house construction and renovation, condo development and financing disputes, numerous joint venture disputes, matters involving demolition, collapse, fire and flood, as well as contract disputes concerning construction quality and warranties; and labour disputes in the construction industry. Arbitrator for Construction Disputes David offers appointment as sole … Read More

COVID-19 / Coronavirus: Are Closing Dates Extended Due to Construction Sites Closing?

Nick P. Poon, B.Sc. (Hons.), B.A., J.D.Arbitration, Civil Litigation, Commercial, Condo Construction, Condo Litigation, Construction | Builders, Construction Litigation, Contract Disputes, Contract Termination, Coronavirus, COVID-19, Force Majeure, Real Estate | Developers, Real Estate Arbitrator, Real Estate Litigation0 Comments

On April 3, 2020, the Ontario government ordered that further non-essential businesses must close by April 4, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. including closing down most construction sites in order to flatten the curve of the COVID-19 pandemic.  The number of essential businesses was reduced from 74 to 44.  The revised list of essential businesses can be found here. Construction sites related to the healthcare sector, provincial infrastructure such as transit, and projects related to the production of ventilators and other products directly related to fighting COVID-19 were permitted to remain open.  Residential construction sites were permitted to remain open where: (i) a footing permit has been granted for single family, semi-detached and townhouses; (ii) an above grade structural permit has been granted for condominiums; or (iii) the work was related to renovations and started before April 4, 2020. Given the expansive definition of essential residential construction sites, it appears that … Read More

Prompt Payment Regime Takes Effect For Construction Projects

Sabrina Saltmarsh, B.A. (Hons), J.D.Arbitration, Condo Construction, Construction Equipment & Machinery, Construction Litigation, Cottage Litigation, Heavy Machinery Disputes, Mining, Infrastructure and Projects, Real Estate | Developers, Real Estate Litigation, Recreational Property, Recreational Property Litigation0 Comments

A major shift has been underway in Ontario since the legislature ushered in reforms under Bill 142, the Construction Lien Amendment Act, 2017, S.O. 2017, c. 24., perhaps none of which is more significant than the prompt payment regime which took effect on October 1, 2019. Changes To Lien Period: Effective July 1, 2018 Changes to the previous legislation (The Construction Lien Act) have come into effect in phases, with the first set of changes having taken effect in July of last year. We are now in the midst of transition rules which apply depending on the commencement date of a construction project to determine the applicable lien period which changed from 45 days to 60 days for prime construction contracts entered into after July 1, 2018. There were several additional notable changes which took effect as of July 1, 2018, including the extension of the period to perfect a … Read More

Cart Before the Horse – Requesting Accommodations to Condominium Common Elements Before Commencing Litigation

Gilbertson Davis LLPAdministrative Law, Commercial Litigation, Condo Construction, Condo Litigation, Construction | Builders, Human Rights0 Comments

In Charlie Andrews v. Great Gulf, 2019 HRTO 370, the applicant, a condominium owner, alleges that the respondent, builder of the condominium complex, failed to provide gender-inclusive washrooms in the pool and stream areas of the condominium building. The builder of the condominium complex did not file a response, but rather, asked that the matter be dismissed as it had no prospect of success, as the builder could not be held liable for the alleged discrimination, since: It no longer had an ongoing service relationship with the condominium; The applicant, as a condominium board member could not point to any requests by any individual, including themselves, that the builder or condominium provide gender-inclusive change rooms; The  subject areas that were allegedly discriminatory were located in the common elements of the condominium and related to accessibility,  rendering it the responsibility of the condominium, of which the applicant was a member; and At the time the … Read More

Fork In the Road: Critical Considerations by Condominium Corporations in Anticipatory Failed Closings

Gilbertson Davis LLPAppeals, Appellate Advocacy, Civil Litigation, Commercial, Commercial Contracts, Condo Construction, Condo Litigation, Contract Disputes, Real Estate Litigation0 Comments

In 1179 Hunt Club Inc. v. Ottawa Medical Square Inc., 2019 ONCA 700, the purchasers, Ottawa Medical Square Group, entered into an Agreement for Purchase and Sale to purchase condominium units owned by the vendor, 1179 Hunt Club Inc. The value of the commercial condominium units in the Hunt Club Project was $5.6 million dollars. Five days before closing, the purchasers, sent a request to the vendor, requesting an extension of time as the purchasers had not yet finalized their arrangements for financing. Three days before closing, the vendor advised that it would insist on closing, and if the purchaser could not close, it would exercise its rights and remedies under the Agreement for Purchase and Sale. On the date of closing, the vendor learned that the Land Registry Office had made an error in assigning parcel identification numbers. Although this error was ameliorated later that day, this mishap, prevented … Read More

Condominium Limitation Periods and Timelines – Mark Your Calendar!

Fatima VieiraCivil Litigation, Commercial, Commercial Arbitration, Commercial Litigation, Condo Construction, Condo Litigation, Construction | Builders, Construction Litigation, Contract Disputes0 Comments

There is continuing intense activity in condominium development in Toronto, the Greater Toronto Area, Hamilton and the Niagara region. Once a condominium corporation is formed by registration of a declaration, it has a lot to do and review, within specific time lines. Getting the essential work done within those specific time lines is crucial to the protection of the rights and remedies of developers, condominium corporations and unit owners. Warranty review time lines occur at one-year, two-year and seven-year marks. If a one-year warranty claim is made, a 120-day period follows for repair or resolution by the builder. If there is no resolution and repairs are incomplete, the condominium corporation has 30 days to request conciliation or assistance with resolution of outstanding issues from the warranty provider.   The conciliation process typically involves inspection by a warranty services representative who then renders a decision as to whether the claims are … Read More