McDonald’s Not Served Valid Revocation of Waiver – Commercial Leasing in the Court of Appeal

David Alderson, LL.B, LL.M (Commercial and Corporate), Lawyer and ArbitratorAppeals, Arbitration, Business Litigation, Commercial, Commercial and Contract Litigation, Commercial Arbitration, Commercial Leasing, Injunction & Specific Performance, Real Estate Litigation, Retail Litigation, Shopping Mall Lease Disputes0 Comments

The Court of Appeal for Ontario in North Elgin Centre Inc. v. McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada Limited, 2018 ONCA 71 allowed an appeal by McDonald’s from a decision on applications by both parties to determine whether  the subject lease came to an end on a described date because McDonald’s had not complied with the renewal provision in the lease. The Court of Appeal allowed the appeal of the decision of the application judge, that despite that the parties were in negotiations, and that the respondent had waived its right to insist on strict compliance with the  terms of the renewal provision (to refer the determination of the renewal rental rate to arbitration), that the respondent had effectively revoked its waiver and reverted to its strict legal rights, namely to terminate the lease in the absence of the referral of the dispute on renewal rental rate to arbitration within the permitted time. On the … Read More

Capturing Online Sales in Shopping Mall Commercial Leases

Robert Kalanda, B.A. (Hons.), J.D.Commercial and Contract Litigation, Contract Disputes, Counterfeit Goods, eCommerce | Online Retail, Shopping Mall Lease Disputes, Shopping Mall Lease Litigation0 Comments

As more business is done online, and as traditional brick-and-mortar retail stores decrease in popularity, shopping malls and retail shopping landlords are looking for more creative methods to maximize rental income. It is not uncommon for a shopping mall lease to require the tenant to pay a percentage of their sales as part of the additional rent. Many stores, however, also do a significant amount of business online. While tenants usually consider such sales to be separate from sales at their physical storefront, landlords may consider those sales as attributable to the storefront and subject to additional rent.  It is important for any commercial lease to be clear how additional rent is calculated, and if additional rent includes a percentage of revenues, it should be clear to all parties what revenue is included and what revenue is excluded. Where a lease is unclear, the court will often rely on the principle of contra proferentum and … Read More